Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital https://www.countryhillspets.com/ Excellence in everything we do Thu, 01 Dec 2022 02:12:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 The Power of Insurance https://www.countryhillspets.com/the-power-of-insurance/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/the-power-of-insurance/#respond Thu, 21 Feb 2019 02:11:53 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=756 Does your pet have pet insurance? Pet insurance is basically health insurance for your pet so that if something happens or they develop a chronic illness, you don't have to pay the entire bill. Here are a couple real-life examples of Country Hills Pet Hospital staff member pets that have greatly benefitted from being on [...]

The post The Power of Insurance appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
Does your pet have pet insurance? Pet insurance is basically health insurance for your pet so that if something happens or they develop a chronic illness, you don’t have to pay the entire bill. Here are a couple real-life examples of Country Hills Pet Hospital staff member pets that have greatly benefitted from being on insurance!

 

Pancreatitis – Ivan (Sarah’s dog)

“Ivan started having diarrhea and vomited all night long, so I took him in the next morning. He was diagnosed with pancreatitis and needed to be hospitalized to get better. I was so thankful that I had him insured because they made it really affordable to get the treatment he needed! He is back to his normal crazy self now! ” –Sarah, CVT

Total cost of diagnosis and treatment: $1,653.58

Amount Insurance paid: $1,335.63

Amount Sarah paid after insurance: $ 317.95

 

What acute illnesses are common in dogs and cats?

Dogs

  • Cruciate ligament tear (torn ligament in the knee)
  • Hit by car, fracture (broken bone)
  • Toxin ingestion (rat poison, grapes/raisins, chocolate, medications, etc)
  • GDV (twisted stomach in large breeds)
  • Intestinal obstruction (ate something that got stuck)

Cats

  • Urethral obstruction (blockage of the flow of urine)
  • Toxin ingestion (lilys, medications, etc)
  • Intestinal obstruction (ate a string or toy that got stuck)

Diabetes – Gabby (Nicole’s cat)

“Gabby had been losing a lot of weight. Changing foods hadn’t been helping, so Dr. Thompson wanted to do bloodwork. It turns out she had diabetes. Insurance was great! They re-imbursed me for all of the bloodwork to diagnose diabetes, and then continued to cover insulin, syringes, and even recheck blood tests. Without pet insurance, I wasn’t sure if I was going to be able to afford treatment, but they helped me have more time with my little torti-cat.” –Nicole, CVT

Total cost for 6 months of treatment: $1,328.01

Amount Insurance paid: $1,068.00

Amount Nicole paid after insurance: $ 260.01

 

What chronic illnesses are common in dogs and cats?

Dogs

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Allergies
  • Ear infections

Cats

  • Diabetes mellitus (similar to Type II diabetes in people)
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Pancreatitis
  • Feline lower urinary tract disease

 

How do I choose a pet insurance for my pet?

There are multiple pet insurance companies to choose from. Each is a little bit different, so I would encourage you to get quotes from the different companies you are interested in, and see which one best fits the needs of you and your pet. The employees at Country Hills Pet Hospital have their pets insured through PetsBest Insurance.

 

Just got a new puppy or kitten?

Now is the PERFECT time to get them insured when they are healthy!

The post The Power of Insurance appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/the-power-of-insurance/feed/ 0
Holiday Dangers https://www.countryhillspets.com/holiday-dangers/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/holiday-dangers/#respond Wed, 05 Dec 2018 16:33:00 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=699 Any time the seasons change, there are new things that pet owners should keep in mind to keep their pet healthy and safe. This holiday season, veterinarians tend to see a few different things more commonly, including dogs getting into the garbage or eating bread dough, dogs and cats eating foreign material that gets stuck [...]

The post Holiday Dangers appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
Any time the seasons change, there are new things that pet owners should keep in mind to keep their pet healthy and safe. This holiday season, veterinarians tend to see a few different things more commonly, including dogs getting into the garbage or eating bread dough, dogs and cats eating foreign material that gets stuck in their intestines, toxicities, and others. I want to discuss these things so you know how to keep your furry family member safe this holiday season!

 

Leftovers, The Garbage

Gastroenteritis: Many dogs like to eat just about anything, including baking ingredients, leftovers, or whatever smells good in the garbage. When dogs eat things they aren’t supposed to, this can upset their stomach and intestines which can lead to nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Gastroenteritis generally resolves uneventfully if adequate supportive care is given, but nobody wants a vomiting dog for the holidays.

Pancreatitis: When dogs eat a high fat meal (turkey fat/grease, butter, etc), they are at an increased risk for developing pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the organ that produces digestive enzymes and insulin. When the pancreas is inflamed, it can cause the dog to have a decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. This sounds very similar to gastroenteritis, but the treatment is more aggressive, so pay extra attention this holiday season that the garbage is off limits and relatives know not to feed your dog their leftovers!

 

Baking Ingredients

Bread dough: An important step in baking bread is letting it sit out to rise. Your dog may see this as a perfect opportunity to have a snack. This can be very problematic since the dough will continue to expand in your dog’s stomach. Have your dog evaluated by a veterinarian right away if you know or suspect that he or she has eaten any amount of bread dough.

Raisins/Grapes: Some people like to use raisins as an ingredient in the bread or dessert they make. Keep these away from your dogs! Grapes and raisins can be toxic to the kidneys. While 50% of dogs do not get sick from ingesting grapes/raisins, the other 50% can develop kidney failure from even ONE grape or raisin. Since we can’t tell which group a dog falls into, we recommend treating every case as though the dog is susceptible. Better to prevent ingestion than have to treat!

 

Decorations

Intestinal foreign bodies: As I said before, dogs like to eat just about anything, including non-food items like ornaments, garland, and toys. Foreign material can cause a blockage in the intestines if it is large enough, and may require surgery to remove. Don’t forget about cats and tinsel/string! This can get caught in the intestines and cause them to bunch up like a telephone cord.

Poinsettias: This common decorative holiday plant can cause mild GI upset in dogs and cats that ingest it. It generally causes nausea, vomiting, and occasionally diarrhea, but these signs tend to be self-limiting and generally don’t require medical treatment.

 

“Happy Holidays” from the entire staff at Country Hills Pet Hospital!

The post Holiday Dangers appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/holiday-dangers/feed/ 0
Pain in Pets https://www.countryhillspets.com/pain-in-pets/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/pain-in-pets/#respond Wed, 07 Nov 2018 01:59:57 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=694 Think of the last time you were in pain (toothache, pulled muscle, stomach ache, etc). How much did it affect your daily life? What if you couldn't voice your concerns about being in pain? What if you didn't have access to pain medication and just had to deal with the discomfort? This is true for [...]

The post Pain in Pets appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
Think of the last time you were in pain (toothache, pulled muscle, stomach ache, etc). How much did it affect your daily life? What if you couldn’t voice your concerns about being in pain? What if you didn’t have access to pain medication and just had to deal with the discomfort? This is true for many pets, but you don’t have to let it be the case for yours.. keep reading!

Is my pet in pain?

Pain can be hard to detect in pets because they, unfortunately, can’t tell us if something hurts. It can also slip past owners if it comes on gradually. Here are some signs to look out for that may indicate your pet is in pain:

  • Mild pain: less active than normal (or than they used to be when they were younger), less interactive with family members, decreased appetite, possibly no signs at all
  • Moderate pain: (in addition to the signs of mild pain listed above), hard time getting up or getting around, limping, doesn’t want to play or interact as much, tender around the affected area, not as friendly as normal with other animals in the household
  • Severe pain: (in addition to the signs of mild and moderate pain listed above), snapping or biting when touched, not placing weight on a leg, standing in a hunched position, crying/whining, avoids moving around if not necessary, cats may hide

 

DO NOT give any human pain medications to your pet! Medications like ASPIRIN and TYLENOL can be toxic to your pet and may prevent us from using safer medications. Please call us before giving any medications to your pet!

What is causing my pet’s pain?

There are many disease processes that can go unnoticed by owners. Read below for the most common things that we see at Country Hills Pet Hospital in terms of underlying pain in pets.

  • Mouth: The mouth is the biggest problem in terms of pets being in pain and not showing it. Even if pets are in moderate to severe pain due to their mouth, they may still eat and act normally! Dental disease may include a broken tooth with pulp (nerve cavity) exposure, severe inflammation of the gums, infection, or resorptive lesions (especially in cats). Can you imagine if you needed a root canal but just had to live with the pain? This is one of the reasons yearly wellness exams are so important so we can check your pet’s mouth for anything that might be causing pain!
  • Abdomen: Does your pet have an appetite that comes and goes? Does your cat vomit regularly (excluding hairballs)? Chronic pancreatitis and other inflammation in the abdomen can cause discomfort and pain that may go unnoticed for years.
  • Joints: Underlying arthritis in old or overweight animals is a very common source of discomfort. Owners may notice their older pet is “slowing down a bit”, “having more trouble with stairs”, or “doesn’t jump up on the couch anymore”. All of these things can be a sign that your pet is experiencing discomfort from osteoarthritis.

What pain control options are there?

Depending on what the source of your pet’s pain is, there are many different options available to make him or her more comfortable including addressing the underlying disease, prescription pain medications, physical therapy modalities, and supplements. Please make an appointment with one of our doctors or give us a call to discuss the best course of treatment tailored to your pet to keep him or her as comfortable as possible. Check out our video from last week or contact our Physical Therapist (Sarah Zurmond CVT) for more in-depth information on Physical Therapy options!

 

Please contact Country Hills Pet Hospital if you think your pet is in pain or would like an evaluation by one of our doctors. We want your furry family members to be pain-free!

The post Pain in Pets appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/pain-in-pets/feed/ 0
Xylitol Toxicity https://www.countryhillspets.com/xylitol-toxicity/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/xylitol-toxicity/#respond Fri, 12 Oct 2018 02:59:05 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=667   The month of October means pumpkin patches, trick-or-treating, dressing up in costumes, and eating lots of candy! While this may be a fun time of year for you and your family, there are hidden dangers that can pose a risk to your pet; one of those dangers is XYLITOL.   What is xylitol? Xylitol [...]

The post Xylitol Toxicity appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>

 

The month of October means pumpkin patches, trick-or-treating, dressing up in costumes, and eating lots of candy! While this may be a fun time of year for you and your family, there are hidden dangers that can pose a risk to your pet; one of those dangers is XYLITOL.

 

What is xylitol?

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener used as a sugar substitute in many common food and household products. Other sugar substitutes (aspartame, malitol, sorbitol) generally are not toxic to dogs.

 

Where could xylitol be hiding?

Products that may contain xylitol include:

  • chewing gum, breath mints
  • sugar-free candy (gummy bears, suckers, hard candy, etc)
  • baked goods, drink powder
  • some brands of peanut butter, ketchup, pancake syrup
  • liquid medications, gummy vitamins
  • toothpaste, sunscreen
  • others

Always check the label of any food you feed to your dog (or that your dog ends up eating!) to make sure xylitol is not listed as an ingredient.

 

What happens if a dog eats something with xylitol in it?

Dogs rapidly absorb xylitol after they consume a product containing it. Signs of toxicity may start to appear within 10-15 minutes after ingestion, with vomiting usually being the first sign. Xylitol causes the dog’s body to release a large amount of insulin which then lowers the dog’s blood sugar dramatically, usually to a very dangerous level. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can cause signs such as weakness, stumbling, collapse, tremoring, seizures, and even death. Another complication from xylitol is called hepatic necrosis, or death of liver cells, which can show up 12-72 hours after the xylitol was ingested. Hepatic necrosis can cause vomiting, icterus (jaundice, yellowing of the skin and eyes), black tarry stool, problems clotting the blood, bruising, neurologic signs, and even death.

 

What should I do if my dog ingests xylitol?

It can be very scary to see your dog exhibiting any of the signs listed above, but the best thing you can do is remain calm and get your dog to a veterinarian right away! There is no antidote for xylitol, but early supportive medical care is extremely important. This can include medications to raise blood sugar, maintain hydration, protect the liver, and prevent/treat seizures. Xylitol ingestion can be fatal, so seeking veterinary care right away may help save your dog’s life!

 

Please contact Country Hills Pet Hospital right away if you think your dog has eaten something that may have contained xylitol. Better to be safe than sorry!

The post Xylitol Toxicity appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/xylitol-toxicity/feed/ 0
Fear Free https://www.countryhillspets.com/fear-free/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/fear-free/#respond Fri, 07 Sep 2018 02:07:57 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=632 What is Fear Free and FAS?  "FAS" stands for fear, anxiety, and stress. Signs of fear, anxiety, and stress in dogs and cats can sometimes go unnoticed or be misinterpreted as aggression. Stressed cats and dogs may freeze in place not wanting to move, try to hide, have dilated pupils, try to avoid the FAS [...]

The post Fear Free appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
What is Fear Free and FAS? 

“FAS” stands for fear, anxiety, and stress. Signs of fear, anxiety, and stress in dogs and cats can sometimes go unnoticed or be misinterpreted as aggression. Stressed cats and dogs may freeze in place not wanting to move, try to hide, have dilated pupils, try to avoid the FAS trigger, and/or growl/hiss. They may also try to bite if feeling especially threatened. “Fear Free” is a program developed by a veterinary behaviorist that focuses on teaching veterinary professionals and pet owners how to recognize and decrease FAS in cats and dogs.

 

What does Country Hills Pet Hospital do to make visits as stress-free as possible for your pet?

  • All employees at Country Hills Pet Hospital have completed the Fear Free Certification program, meaning all staff members are aware of fear, anxiety, and stress (FAS) triggers and how to avoid them to make your pet more comfortable at the clinic.
  • Treats and verbal praise are used during the appointment to help your pet view the situation as less threatening and sometimes even fun!
  • Our certified veterinary technicians are trained in how to approach your pet and restrain him or her in a way that is as stress-free as possible.
  • We provide calming pheromones in all of our exam rooms (Feliway in cat rooms, Adaptil in dog rooms) to give your pet the signal that everything is ok and this is a safe place.
  • Cats are immediately placed into a cat-only exam room upon arrival so they experience the least amount of FAS from other dog patients as possible.
  • We offer complimentary doses of anti-anxiety and sedative medication that you can give to your pet 1-2 hours prior to the veterinary visit to make the experience less stressful for him or her.

*Please be aware: These medications can interact with other medications your pet is taking, so please contact us to discuss if an anti-anxiety or sedative medication is right for your pet.

What can I do at home to decrease fear, anxiety, and stress in my dog?

There are many things you can do at home to help decrease stress and anxiety for your pet in all different realms (bathing, nail trimming, encountering new people, etc). The founder of the Fear Free movement has recently released a book targeted toward pet owners that addresses these techniques. The book is titled “From Fearful to Fear Free” by Dr. Marty Becker and is available to purchase on Amazon.com. If you are interested in incorporating Fear Free practices into your home, give this book a try!

The post Fear Free appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/fear-free/feed/ 0
Kennel Cough https://www.countryhillspets.com/kennel-cough/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/kennel-cough/#respond Fri, 03 Aug 2018 17:44:23 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=614 What is kennel cough? Kennel cough is a generic term commonly used when talking about canine infectious tracheobronchitis. This is an overarching descriptor that encompasses many different infectious causes of upper respiratory disease in dogs.  There are many different viruses and bacteria that can cause upper respiratory disease in dogs. Most commonly it is a [...]

The post Kennel Cough appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>

What is kennel cough?

Kennel cough is a generic term commonly used when talking about canine infectious tracheobronchitis. This is an overarching descriptor that encompasses many different infectious causes of upper respiratory disease in dogs.  There are many different viruses and bacteria that can cause upper respiratory disease in dogs. Most commonly it is a virus that dampens the dog’s respiratory defenses and leads to a secondary bacterial infection. Viruses include parainfluenza, distemper virus, and adenovirus. Bacterial agents include Bordetella, Mycoplasma, and other normal respiratory bacteria that overgrow.

 

How would my dog get kennel cough?

Kennel cough is transmitted in the same way that the human cold is transmitted – airborne virus or bacteria. Your dog does not have to have been at a kennel to contract a contagious upper respiratory disease, he or she can merely have brief contact with another dog such as outside on a walk, going to doggie daycare, or being “kenneled”/boarded while you are away.

 

How can it be treated?

Treatment depends on the underlying cause. Usually, as with the human cold, it will run its course without treatment if the dog is generally healthy. However, there are certain things we can do to lessen the symptoms and make your dog more comfortable. Coughing can turn into a vicious cycle of coughing leading to inflammation in the airway with causes even more coughing. A cough suppressant and anti-inflammatory medication can help stop that cycle from progressing. If a secondary bacterial infection is suspected, antibiotics can also be helpful to rid the body of the infection.

 

What can I do to prevent upper respiratory disease in my dog?Image result for bronchi shield oral

  • The most important thing to do is to have your dog up to date on vaccinations that protect against different causes of upper respiratory disease. The upper respiratory vaccines we recommend at Country Hills Pet Hospital are the bordetella vaccine and the DA2PP combination vaccine which protects against many infectious diseases including upper respiratory disease caused by the distemper virus, parainfluenza virus, and adenovirus.
  • Be familiar with the other dogs your pet is around. If they are coughing, do not let your dog come into contact with them until they are healed and no longer contagious.
  • Keep your dog in a well-ventilated area. This is especially important when multiple dogs are housed in the same space (such as a kennel or daycare facility). Stay tuned in the upcoming weeks for information on boarding at Country Hills Pet Hospital and our advanced ventilation system to keep our boarding dogs healthy!

 

If your dog is coughing, please keep him or her away from other dogs and make an appointment to have your pet evaluated by a veterinarian.

*There are many causes of coughing in dogs, and it is important to rule out other causes (such as heart disease) before assuming it is kennel cough.

 

 

View Our August Monthly Newsletter

The post Kennel Cough appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/kennel-cough/feed/ 0
Veterinary FAQs https://www.countryhillspets.com/veterinary-faqs/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/veterinary-faqs/#respond Sat, 14 Jul 2018 06:47:05 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=516 Country Hills Pet Hospital is committed to you and your pet! We understand that your pet holds a valued place in your life and your heart, so naturally you have questions about how to keep them healthy and happy. Trust me when I say we have heard some interesting and outrageous questions/stories to say the [...]

The post Veterinary FAQs appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
Country Hills Pet Hospital is committed to you and your pet! We understand that your pet holds a valued place in your life and your heart, so naturally you have questions about how to keep them healthy and happy. Trust me when I say we have heard some interesting and outrageous questions/stories to say the least, we have probably even heard it all! There are a few questions, though, that seem to reoccur throughout the day that we’d like to answer! The following list has been composed to not only help you and your pet have a successful and hopefully stress-free trip to the vet, but also to help develop a long-lasting relationship with both the veterinarians & their staff.

1. Can I arrive late or unannounced for an appointment?
It is recommended to please always call for an appointment or at the very least try to let us know you are headed our way with an emergency.  Without an appointment, you may be asked to leave your pet as a “drop-off” appointment or wait until the next available time slot if your pet’s condition is not serious. Calling ahead not only helps us rearrange our schedule if necessary, but also to be better prepared with available staff and any medications/supplies your pet may need right away! We also understand when delays happen, but giving us a heads up can help us to let you know whether the doctor is available to see you when you arrive or if there will be a small wait for an available exam room. Let me just say, we don’t like being behind any more than you like waiting!

2. Do I have to bring my pet in with a leash or carrier- they aren’t on one at home and they hate being cooped up?
Our waiting room can be crowded at times and we want to make sure everyone is under control and in the safest condition possible. If you know your pet is aggressive towards others, be sure to let the staff know ahead of time and we can usher you into a room when you arrive! Not to mention, retractable leads are great, but keeping them in the shortest, locked position possible for the duration of your visit is best. We don’t want Fluffy meeting Rocky during checkout or an innocent bystander getting tripped up over unattended leashes! Oh No- forgot your leash? No problem- we have plenty of colorful leashes hanging up in the lobby for yours to keep before, during, and after your pet’s appointment!

3. My pet may bite- I probably should let someone know about it.
Yes Please! Our trained technicians can read most animal’s body language; however, you know your pets even better! Our staff also knows that pets act differently at the vet’s office (my own cat included!). If you think or know that your pet may try to bite or scratch, don’t be afraid to let us know. A pet can act out of character in the vet clinic for a number of reasons- pain, fear, different smells, or the need to protect their human can all provoke aggression. Fortunately, there are ways to work effectively with a fear aggressive pet. Muzzles, sedation, and sometimes even separating them from their owners can safely subdue aggressive tendencies. If an exam needs to be performed in the treatment area away from you, this does not by any means point to you or your pet for being bad, we just have everyone’s best interest for safety in mind and would hate to see anyone get injured!

4. Do I really need to tell the vet the little details?
In order to understand why your dog is feeling poorly or to know which medications can be safely used to treat your pet, the doctor needs to know pertinent information. If your dog has you trained to feed him/her table food, then they aren’t just eating dog food. If you’ve been sharing your own medications, they fell out of the car because they weren’t properly restrained, or they ate a batch of your “special” brownies- it needs to be said. It may be something embarrassing or awkward like eating out of the bathroom garbage or maybe your favorite pair of underwear is missing, but let’s be honest, we’ve seen it and heard it all before! We can tell when the facts don’t add up-your pet’s incision couldn’t possibly have opened up with your pet properly wearing their cone of shame. Giving all the facts could not only save you money on unnecessary tests/medications, but it could save your pet’s life!
If your pet accidently gets into medications, poisons, or food they shouldn’t; always remember to gather all the facts. When, how much, product names/ packaging, and strength/dose are needed to accurately diagnose & treat your pet!

5. Can I have someone else bring in my pet?
This is your chance to communicate with your veterinarian and be your pet’s advocate. Again, the veterinarian needs to know as much information about your pet’s illness, symptoms, and progression as possible, and without these things, the right diagnosis may be missed (see #4).If your child, mother, brother, etc can’t make important financial decisions for the proper medications or testing, your pet may not get the treatment they need. When your pet is sick it helps to have the decision-makers present at the visit, details like how to administer medications properly or what to do if symptoms continue can easily get lost in translation, even when traveling from spouse to spouse!

6. My cell phone is ringing, should I take this call now?
Our staff is giving you their undivided attention during your appointment time and need to be able to communicate with you. We are all human and know emergency calls need to be taken, let us know what’s going on and if another decision-making adult is with you, feel free to step out of the room- we will be sure to catch you up when you return!

7. My pet is having issues with urination- what should I do?
The first step to diagnosing a urinary tract issue is testing a sample. If your pet has been having accidents in the house and think a sample may be needed for testing try to collect one at home or at least try not to let them water the bushes out front before your appointment! Collecting a sample at home may not sound fun for you, but it really is easier on your pet (and us too for that matter). This way, they won’t have to leave the room to collect a urine sample only to be distracted by all the wonderful smells of pets previously before them! Of course there are times where they just won’t cooperate at home and give you what you need. No problem- just try to keep them from relieving themselves on the way!

8. My pet is really attached to me, can I hold him/her for you?
Doing an exam or taking a temperature on a cat or dog can prove to be a difficult task sometimes. Our staff is properly trained on how to restrain your pets safely so no one gets injured. While you may think that Princess would do better in your arms, you are the last person we want to see get bit or scratched. The veterinarians have a routine in the way they examine your pet and won’t be able to get a proper look if your hand, leg, chest, or other awkward body part is in the way. The staff also needs the proper space to be able to move around the exam table and shift your pet accordingly. It may seem like petting & snuggling them is reassuring, but in some cases, it just excites your pet even more. Just having you in their vision and hearing you talk to them can be enough to keep your pet calm.

9. I have bite wounds from my pet- should I show the vet?
While we definitely care about our client’s well being and health; our veterinarians are animal doctors, not people doctors. There are some diseases that can be passed back and forth between humans and animals and we will take the time to warn you about those and in some instances may even advise you to see your own doctor. However, human medical questions should be saved for your own doctor. Showing off bite wounds, bruises, or bug marks in inappropriate areas is not something we really want to see- a verbal explanation is just fine and less embarrassing for everyone in the room.

10. I am on antibiotics myself- can I just give these to my pet?
While there are tons of medications for people, it is not recommended to give most of these to your pets. Human medications are not always processed the same way in cats & dogs and can cause more harm than good. Even giving just one Tylenol can cause serious harm to your cat. Sometimes veterinary drugs have a generic version that is made for humans and carried at your local pharmacy for less cost; however, certain ingredients contained may not be appropriate for your pets. Also, failing to mention any medications or supplements that your pet is getting can cause serious drug interactions and may prevent your pet from getting the right medication they need now.

So the next time you need to bring your pet in to see our staff; keep these answers in mind to help make your trip a happy one for all involved and don’t forget to ask lots of questions! We love hearing them and can’t wait to educate you with answers!

The post Veterinary FAQs appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/veterinary-faqs/feed/ 0
Grain Free- The Scoop on Pet Food https://www.countryhillspets.com/grain-free-the-scoop-on-pet-food/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/grain-free-the-scoop-on-pet-food/#respond Sat, 14 Jul 2018 06:40:01 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=511 Grain Free? In this day and age, marketing departments are coming out with impressive designs- images of wolves, Holistic/Grain & Gluten Free labeling, and brightly colored bags. Walk in to any pet store and you immediately notice the many different choices & brands of pet food. Purina, Iams, Nutro, Royal Canin, Science Diet, Rachel Ray, [...]

The post Grain Free- The Scoop on Pet Food appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
Grain Free?

In this day and age, marketing departments are coming out with impressive designs- images of wolves, Holistic/Grain & Gluten Free labeling, and brightly colored bags. Walk in to any pet store and you immediately notice the many different choices & brands of pet food. Purina, Iams, Nutro, Royal Canin, Science Diet, Rachel Ray, Blue Buffalo, Old Roy- the list goes on and on. Don’t be fooled by marketing ploys!

Ingredient debates have been a hot topic lately! Which one really is the best for your pet? What really are by-products? Is “organic” food worth the extra cost? Country Hills Pet Hospital is here to debunk these pet food allergy myths!

  • Food allergies are actually uncommon, making up less than 10% (I repeat- only 10%) of your pet’s allergies! Flea bites and allergies to pollens, molds, and dust mites are the most common triggers to your pet’s itchy ears, skin, and paws. Not to mention, most food reactions come from meats (like chicken & beef) or dairy. Now this isn’t to say your pet can’t be allergic to grains, corn, carrots, beef, or chicken; it’s just not the only possible, or probable, cause! Short of allergy testing, it’s guesswork as to what exactly your pet is allergic to.
    Actually did you know that wheat and corn are highly digestible and provide nutrients like carbohydrates and fatty acids? Some grain-free diets may even include a higher amount of fat & calories by substituting starches (like potato) for whole grains. If your pet truly has severe food allergies, a veterinary diet is the best choice. These diets have hydrolyzed proteins that have all the nutrients of a balanced diet without the properties of the foods that actually cause the allergic reaction.
  • By-products/Meal (sounds gross right) makes you think of meat that is unfit to eat. On the contrary- it includes organs such as the liver, lungs, and heart as confirmed by the American Association of Feed Control Officials. If your pet was in the wild and on its own for lunch- these organs would be where they would dig into first! Chicken meal is dehydrated and defatted chicken which is very digestible and a good source of concentrated protein.
  • Organic diets may sound like the option to go for us, but the word organic, in this case, does not refer to quality. Organic, when it comes to pet food, just means the plants/animals of how they were grown/raised is processed differently. These diets consist of flax seed instead of marine plants and fish as a source of fatty acids. However they lack EPA and DHA- major omega-3 fatty acids that support skin health, joints, and kidneys.
  • Raw/homemade diets are generally not recommended for your pet. The FDA has made statements regarding public safety from significant health concerns when raw materials are used in the home. Homemade diets also often lack all the proper nutrients, vitamins, and minerals that a commercially made pet food has.
  • One size fits all- these diets are not a good fit for your pet. Puppies need different ingredients focusing on growth and development while senior pets need ingredients that help the joints & body.

Did you know Dr. Thompson and Dr. Winske recommend Royal Canin? They are the only pet food company that has their own staff of veterinary scientists used to generate their pet food formulas. They also use their own manufacturing plants for their food- cutting down on cross contamination of materials. All of their diets are 100% guaranteed and highly palatable. With a wide range of both over the counter (even breed specific) and veterinary prescription diets (& treats too), there’s a complete diet for all of our pet’s needs.

Before switching your pet’s food, consult with your veterinarian to find out which diet is best for your pet! Switching foods around can cause stomach upset in your pet- diarrhea, vomiting, in appetence, etc. Remember, no pet food is ultimately “wrong” for your companion, however there are guidelines, truths, and plenty of myths to consider when walking those long aisles at the pet store.

The post Grain Free- The Scoop on Pet Food appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/grain-free-the-scoop-on-pet-food/feed/ 0
What’s Hiding in Your Pets Feces- It’s Giardia https://www.countryhillspets.com/whats-hiding-in-your-pets-feces-its-giardia/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/whats-hiding-in-your-pets-feces-its-giardia/#respond Sat, 14 Jul 2018 06:33:33 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=504 Ok so we know everyone’s favorite part of being a pet owner is picking up land mines in the backyard or scooping the litter box right? NOT! Even better, is bringing in a sample of your pet’s business for testing- forgetting it on the counter, or in your fridge, or even in your car can [...]

The post What’s Hiding in Your Pets Feces- It’s Giardia appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
Ok so we know everyone’s favorite part of being a pet owner is picking up land mines in the backyard or scooping the litter box right? NOT! Even better, is bringing in a sample of your pet’s business for testing- forgetting it on the counter, or in your fridge, or even in your car can make for a stinky situation! However it is an important, while unpleasant, part of ownership! If it’s been over a year since your pet has had a fecal test, or if you’ve just keep putting it off (or, yes, forgetting about it), now’s the time!  Spring is (or WAS!) here, the ground will be thawing, and you never know what might be lurking on the ground, even in your own backyard!

Some of you may be asking, why is a fecal test so important to test every year? Because, even a healthy pet can be carrying around worms, that’s why! The most common intestinal parasites in the US include roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, giardia, coccidia, whipworms (dogs), or even toxocariasis (cats). These parasites can cause illness in your pet and can even be transmitted to people, children being the most vulnerable! Yuck!

Your probably thinking, my cat doesn’t even go outside or that your dog only goes outside just to do their business and comes back in.  A fecal test is still recommended! Your cat can get parasites from eating a flea while grooming themselves, ingesting rodents or insects, or even from contaminated soil and water. While indoor-only pets are at a lower risk for parasites, they can still be exposed. Other pets and even people that venture outdoors can bring parasite eggs inside on their paws or shoes from stepping in feces or contaminated areas. Here’s even a fun fact to ponder, did you know that 15% of potting soil can contain roundworm eggs, making indoor plants a risk for transmission?

The majority of these parasites are not even visible to the eyes. Microscopes are needed in order to see eggs or “cysts” on a slide, sometimes making detection tricky. Eggs are also not shed continuously, so while a fecal sample may look negative, it does not rule out the existence of parasites. Lucky for you and your pet, our fecal screening detects antigens of roundworms, hookworms, and giardia.

Your pet may have diarrhea, lethargy, potbellied appearances in puppies & kittens (about 95% have some sort of parasite!), vomiting, weight loss or even NO symptoms at all. While treatment for parasites is pretty simple, unfortunately there is not one deworming medication that will treat all parasites. Which brings us back to why testing is so important! Knowing what we are treating for helps your veterinarian prescribe the right prescription for your pet.

Now here are 2 more reasons to check your pet’s stool sample besides all the health risks to not only your pet, but you too!  The Dog Park-Fecal testing is required to enter the Country Hills Dog Park. We provide a safe and controlled environment for clients and their pets! Wellness Plans- All levels of our Petly Plans include a yearly fecal test, making it easier for you financially and ease of remembering to bring in that sample too!

After all that, how to even get a sample may be crossing your mind. Rest assured it’s pretty simple, the hard part is just remembering to bring it along to your visit. After your pet leaves a fresh sample outside or in the box, scoop it into a Ziploc bag, a grocery bag, a plastic container, or even that old cool whip container you have laying around! It doesn’t matter to us if it’s in a McDonald’s big mac box (yup we’ve seen it!) as long as it’s fresh within 24 hours and has been kept cool, NOT frozen.  You don’t even have to bring the entire smelly pile, just a good chunk that’s at least a tablespoon in size is sufficient for testing!

So for any of the reasons listed above, the time is now to test your pet’s fecal!

We also have been seeing a lot of positive tests lately and even more confused owners! Here’s the scoop on Giardia!

Giardia is a common protozoal disease seen year-round in both our dogs and cats. What’s a protozoa you may ask, it is a single-celled organism that is neither a bacteria or virus. Other examples of protozoal parasites are Coccidia, Cryptosporidia, and Toxoplasma.

Giardia is a zoonotic disease, this means it can be transmitted to us from our pets. Giardia is passed by coming in contact with contaminated stool or water; it must be ingested to become infected.  Pets can get it by drinking from stagnant water like ponds & puddles or by eating stool at the dog park or during a walk. While infection from pets to humans is rare- it does happen. Most commonly people get it from drinking untreated water- like streams, ponds, or even swimming pools, or eating uncooked, raw foods! Good hygiene is key when dealing with this type of infection. After cleaning up after your pet, whether it is a litter box or picking up outside, always wash your hands. On a side note- wearing gloves while gardening can also protect you from Giardia.

How would I know if my dog has this? The most common clinical sign is diarrhea. Other symptoms may include gas or greasy stool. However, some pets can be infected yet may not show any signs at all! This is why we recommend checking a routine stool sample yearly to make sure it doesn’t go undetected.

My pet has it- what do I do? Giardia is easily treated with two medications, an antibiotic called Metronidazole  and a dewormer called Panacur.  While the Metronidazole is given short term, only 5-7 days, the Panacur is repeated again in 3 weeks. Six weeks after initial detection, a repeat test is recommended. Strongly infected pets may need more than one round of medications. Because Giardia is contagious, if one pet is affected, all the pets in the household therefore need to be treated as well. Otherwise you could be in for a never ending cycle of diarrhea, stool testing, and medications- yuck!

Remember always to ask your veterinarian before trying any home remedies or over the counter medications!

The post What’s Hiding in Your Pets Feces- It’s Giardia appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/whats-hiding-in-your-pets-feces-its-giardia/feed/ 0
Pet Dental Hygeine- Behind the Scenes of a Comprehensive Oral Workup https://www.countryhillspets.com/pet-dental-hygeine-behind-the-scenes-of-a-comprehensive-oral-workup/ https://www.countryhillspets.com/pet-dental-hygeine-behind-the-scenes-of-a-comprehensive-oral-workup/#respond Sat, 14 Jul 2018 06:14:16 +0000 https://www.countryhillspets.com/?p=493 February is National Pet Dental Health Month! Studies by the American Animal Hospital Association reveal that nearly 2/3 of pet owners do not provide the dental care for their pets recommended by veterinarians – is your pet getting the dental care he/she needs? Dental disease is the most common disease in dogs and cats, affecting [...]

The post Pet Dental Hygeine- Behind the Scenes of a Comprehensive Oral Workup appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
February is National Pet Dental Health Month! Studies by the American Animal Hospital Association reveal that nearly 2/3 of pet owners do not provide the dental care for their pets recommended by veterinarians – is your pet getting the dental care he/she needs? Dental disease is the most common disease in dogs and cats, affecting 78% of dogs and 68% of cats over the age of 3, this statistic were reported by Banfield Pet Hospital.
Dental hygiene is an important part of your pet’s health. Signs that your pet may be having trouble may include drooling, discomfort while chewing, and loose or missing teeth.  Dental disease can also be linked with other serious health problems such as heart disease and kidney disease if left untreated. But how do you know if your pet has a healthy mouth?  It is best to have your veterinarian examine your pet’s teeth and gums to help determine if there are any dental issues you should know about.

Size and breed of your dog also differs in the type of dental disease they can encounter. Small dogs have a variety of different bacteria that causes bad breath, gum recession, and eventual loss of teeth. While large dogs are more likely to fracture a tooth from aggressive chewing and come down with an abscess or pulp exposure.

As an AAHA accredited hospital, our dental suite features state of the art technology to provide a thorough cleaning of your pet’s teeth. Only the safest anesthesia is used and your pet is continually monitored while under sedation. Dental cleanings at Country Hills Pet Hospital include an ultrasonic cleaning & polishing of all the teeth and a fluoride treatment. All of your pet’s teeth and gums are carefully evaluated for evidence of disease and injury and dental radiographs are taken for further evaluation of roots under the gum line. After review of your pet’s overall dental health, dental extractions may be recommended.

Despite what many pet owners may believe, “dog breath” is not just a nuisance – it’s an indication that much more is going on in your pet’s mouth. Over time, bacteria lead to plaque and tartar buildup on your pet’s teeth. The result is bad breath, reddened gums, and other common signs of early dental disease. Even if you’re using treats and chews to help control tartar, these are frequently not enough to keep dental disease in check, especially if they are just getting swallowed and not chewed.

Our veterinarians recommend our special dental spray & wipes with antimicrobial activities help to reduce signs of dental disease. They are far easier to use than brushing your pet’s teeth and yet just as effective. One swipe of a wipe or one sprits of the spray on each side of the mouth, over the teeth & gums, and you’re done. Your pet’s saliva will generate the medication over the inside of the mouth and will reach all of the other teeth as well. For best results it is recommended to withhold food and water for 30 minutes before each application of the spray. Both of these products can be used daily or at a maintenance schedule of 1-2 times per week for effective tartar prevention.

Even if you think your pet’s teeth and gums are fine, dental products and especially regular dental cleanings can help you keep them that way! Dental health shouldn’t be taken for granted. Fortunately, with a little at-home care many dental problems can be managed before they become serious!

When your pet has been dropped off for a comprehensive oral workup- here’s what happens behind the scenes!

First he/she will be intubated and put under anesthesia. Intubation helps keep water from entering your pet’s lungs during the procedure. Our clinic uses only the safest anesthesia protocols and a technician monitors your pet the whole time while another performs the procedure.

Your pet’s mouth will then be x-rayed. Full-mouth radiographs allow your veterinarian to view the internal anatomy of the tooth, the tooth roots, and the bone that surrounds the roots. Additionally, the initial x-rays provide a base line for future comparison as your animal ages.

After the radiographs, comes the cleaning. The teeth are ultrasonically cleaned & polished and finished off with a fluoride treatment. All of your pet’s teeth and gums are then carefully charted & evaluated for evidence of disease or injury by Dr. Thompson.

After review of your pet’s overall dental health, oral surgery may be recommended requiring a follow up visit.

 

The post Pet Dental Hygeine- Behind the Scenes of a Comprehensive Oral Workup appeared first on Vet In Eden | Country Hills Pet Hospital.

]]>
https://www.countryhillspets.com/pet-dental-hygeine-behind-the-scenes-of-a-comprehensive-oral-workup/feed/ 0